And the Nobel goes to the blue light-emitting diode (LED)

“Incandescent light bulbs had lit the 20th century; the 21st century will be lit by LED lamps”. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 was awarded jointly to Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, from Nagoya University, and to Shuji Nakamura, from University of California, Santa Barbara. The three Japanese scientists made researches on semiconductor materials used in the blue light-emitting diode (LED), thus making possible the creation of a new generation of energy-saving light bulbs, which have low power requirements and can be powered even by cheap local solar energy.

«The LED lamp also holds great promise when it comes to the possibility of increasing the quality of life for the more than 1.5 billion people who currently lack access to electricity grids», as explained in the award justification.

Light-emitting diodes are used not only in light bulbs, but largely also in mobile electronic devices, first of all in cell phones. For thirty years, scientists have been working worldwide on red and green light-emitting diodes, but without the blue-emitting ones develuped by the three Japanese, it would not be possible creating the white light bulbs, which the market longs so much for. Akasaki, Amano and Nakamura identified and separated the blu part from semiconductors and “really revolutionized lighting technology”, as the Nobel Jury concludes.

And the Nobel goes to the blue light-emitting diode (LED)

A biodynamic life
by Giuliana Zoppis

And the Nobel goes to the blue light-emitting diode (LED)

News, events, products and services for an innovative and conscious lifestyle:
all that can give an ecologic shift to everyday actions with responsibility, curiosity, creativity and the desire of improving us and the world we live in.

This is the section led by Giuliana Zoppis, architect, journalist and expert of ecodesign, biobuilding and socio-environmental sustainability. In 2006, together with Clara Mantica , she founded Best Up the first chain for promoting the sustainable living.